May 012014
 

This month has a huge surprise for all of you…it is Sewing Indie Month!  This month will compile tons of interviews, tutorials, and special goodies from tons of independent pattern designers all put together by Mari from Seamster Patterns. To get all the details, check out her blog post here. Also, grab a Sewing Indie Month badge from the sidebar!

Twenty one different independent designers are participating! It has been incredible! There are also over $1,000 worth of prizes available. See the information about the prizes here.

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There will also be sew-alongs and prizes hosted by various bloggers around the web. Lolita Patterns is offering patterns in the prize pack for the Dressed to the Nines category put on by Laura from Lilacs and Lace.

Sewing Indie Month designer prize pack: PDF pattern of your choice from Lolita, Pauline Alice; paper pattern of your choice from By Hand London, Christine Haynes

Sewing Indie Month designer prize pack: PDF pattern of your choice from Lolita Patterns, Pauline Alice; paper pattern of your choice from By Hand London, Christine Haynes

Hopefully this month will show you all the great independent pattern companies that are around and help you learn a little bit more about them. Today I am so excited to show you this fantastic tutorial put together by Stepalica. Stepalica makes wonderful more advanced patterns. Check out this Nougat Dress with the gorgeous spiral detailing. 

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And the recently released Zlata skirt

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Today Ana will show you how to convert a basic skirt pattern into this beautiful YSL inspired skirt. Her instructions are so detailed that anyone can follow along and end up with a high end designer skirt at a fraction of the cost!  Without further delay, here is her tutorial:

I am so thrilled to show you a lovely and unusual skirt I made. At first glance it looks like a basic pleated skirt, but take a closer look at it and you’ll notice it’s a skirt with a twist, or should I say – a twisted skirt. The knife pleats are slightly angled, thus making the twist effect.

I got an idea for this skirt from a commercial for a YSL bag. The bag itself didn’t impress me as much as the skirt from the photo did. Just look at lines of those pleats – such an ingenious design! My interpretation is slightly different, but I kept the basic design of it.

YSL-inspiration-photo

YSL advertisement that inspired this skirt tutorial

This kind of skirt is perfect for office and work environment, but it could look quite casual if made from denim, twill or cotton. It is suitable for plain fabrics or those with floral or abstract prints, but I’d advise you to avoid using plaid and striped fabrics, since those can be challenging for matching.

A pattern for this skirt is really easy to make, especially if you have a pattern for a basic pencil skirt – with just a few cuts you can transform it into this lovely and unusual skirt.

Jewelry made by Anya - Studio Artesania (http://studioartesania.blogspot.com/)

01_BasicSkirtPattern

1.

- Start with a basic skirt pattern that has waist darts.

- If you’re using a pencil skirt pattern that tapers towards the hemline, straighten the side seams so that they’re perpendicular to the hemline.

- Copy the panels to a new sheet of paper, transferring both left and right side of each of them.

- Join the front and back panels along the right side seam (the right side of the pattern will represent the right side of the fabric).

02_MarkPleatsDirection

2.

- Draw a set of parallel lines connecting the waistline with the hemline. The lines should be angled – you can use one of your waist darts to define the angle of the line (in the drawing, I used the back dart). There should be nine lines:

  • one for each dart,
  • one for the center front line,
  • one for the center back line,
  • one for the right side seam,
  • two for the left side seam, as shown on the picture.

- Each line (except for the ones that correspond to the center front and center back lines of the skirt) should be drawn so that it intersects with the apex of the corresponding waist dart, or with the point on the side seam where the front and back panels form a V shape.

- Measure the width of each waist dart. Optionally, you can copy the shape of each dart by making small triangles as guides for the next step.

03_RotateDarts 3. 

- Rotate each of the darts so that it’s width is equally spread to the left and right side of the angled line that corresponds to it. Make sure the apex of the dart remains in its original position.

- If you were using triangular templates as dart guides, fixe them in place. If not, redraw the darts on the pattern.

04_CutPanels

4. Cut the front and back skirt panels along the angled lines.

05_SpreadPanels

5. 

- Define how wide the pleat should be when folded. I’ll call this measurement the pleat width. In my case, the dart width was 1.5” (4.5 cm).

- Multiply the pleat width by 2, so in my case that’s  3” (9 cm) – this will be total pleat width.

- Spread the panels as shown on the picture. The distance between the two panels should be equal to the total dart width.

- Split the distance between the left and right panels in two, by drawing a line parallel to the panels.

- Also, draw two lines, one on each side of the pattern; each line should be distanced from the pattern by pleat width.

- Define the point on the skirt where the pleats should start and draw a line at that point, parallel to the hemline

06_RedrawShape

6. Transfer the shape of the skirt to a new sheet of paper as shown on the picture. Spread the front and back skirt panels.

07_SkirtPattern

7. This is how the final skirt pattern should look.

08_DraftLining

8.

- Take the panels gotten in the step 4 and lay them over a sheet of paper. Close the waist dart on both front and back skirt panel, by rotating the panels as shown on the picture. Fill the gap that’s been made by the dart rotation at the hemline.

- Smooth the hemline and the waistline so that they form nice curves. Redraw the shape to the paper.

09_LiningPattern

9. This is how the lining pattern should look.

Ready for some finished photos of the skirt?

stepalica-twisted-pleats-skirt-01 stepalica-twisted-pleats-skirt-04 stepalica-twisted-pleats-skirt-07 stepalica-twisted-pleats-skirt-10

I hope you all enjoyed this fantastic tutorial Ana from Stepalica put together. I adore this skirt and cannot wait to make one of my own. It is the perfect combination of stylish with interesting lines but still perfect for the office. I hope you enjoyed this first installment of Sewing Indie Month…don’t forget to check out Seamster Patterns for what else is in store coming up this month!

  12 Responses to “Sewing Indie Month with Stepalica-Twisted Pleats Skirt Tutorial”

  1. Wow! This is so cool! What a fantastic design and clear tutorial. Thanks Ana and Amity. This was the perfect start to Sewing Indie Month!

  2. What a lovely skirt, and a creative make! Talk about making something no one else will have! Hurray for indie pattern month.

  3. Whoa, this is really cool! I love the topstiching and the pleats.

  4. […] Her tutorial shows how to adapt a basic pencil skirt pattern to make this gorgeous skirt.  Go to Lolita Patterns to find her […]

  5. What a great tutorial!

  6. Cool skirt! Very interesting to learn from another sewing design point of view!

  7. […] the patterns she creates incorporate beautifully structured, geometric details. Have you seen the twisted pleats skirt tutorial she wrote for Lolita Patterns for Sewing Indie Month? Oh, and take a look at her […]

  8. […] Indie Month started off with a bang. Ana of Stepalica Patterns posted a tutorial on how to draft a really cool twisted pleat skirt based off an Yves Saint Laurent design. I really want to make one! But that’s not all that […]

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